sonoluminescence

KeelyNet: Dale Pond: The Four Basic Types of Cavitation (January 1st, 1995)

KEELYNET:CAVITY1.ASC

                                  CAVITATION

There are four basic types of cavitation. Fundamentally cavitation results
from a drop in pressure on a liquid creates pockets or bubbles in the liquid -
an increase in pressure causes these bubbles to collapse resulting in a
tremendous "local" force which can cause damage to metals, emulsification, de-
gasification, sonoluminescence and many other strange and wonderous phenomena.

Sonofusion according to wikipedia (jumble of pages slapped together)

--------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Esa Ruoho <esaruoho @ g m a i l .com>
Date: 22-Mar-2007 14:14
Subject: sonofusion according to wikipedia (jumble of pages slapped together)
To: [email protected]

ok
wikipedia likes to call sonofusion "bubble fusion" too (see end of message)
acoustic cavitation they want to call sonic cavitation.

so according to this Sonofusion is a common name for nuclear fusion, occurring during sonoluminescence, which is an extreme form of acoustic cavitation. acoustic cavitation occurs when ultrasound-waves are passed through a liquid, which causes the formation of bubbles, which is known as cavitation.
because a sound-wave periodically compresses/decompresses (NOTE! inhale-exhale) a liquid, cavitation can be produced in the low-pressure part of the cycle, when the sound intensity is enough.

WikiPedia when talking about cavitation, mentions impellers, but does in no way explain whether there is a connection between the rotational frequency of the impeller, the shape of it, and cavitation occurring. however, it has been suggested in books by Callum Coats, that cavitation is a intense reaction caused in pressure-based propellers or impellers, and this is because of the poor movement of this shape. that this causes the impellers+propellers damage!

wikipedia also speaks of non-inertial cavitation, where a bubble in a fluid is forced to _oscillate_ in size/shape due to an acoustic field. this is used in ultrasonic cleaning of baths.

Sonoluminescence: "the emission of short bursts of light from imploding bubbles in a liquid when excited by sound."

Dale Pond equates "Implosion" "Water-hammer effect" and "Cavitation" as being the same thing, which keely and schauberger and were working towards.


He speaks of it in these two videos:
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=9125003792513982191


http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-5430570751600484561


 

Triboluminescence

page 303 of Living Energies by Coats and Schauberger

Triboluminescence: An internal glow or luminescence produced when two or more crystalline rocks of similar composition are rubbed hard together or struck against one another and is attributed to the energy given off by the electrons contained the rocks as they return from a pressure-induced, excited state to their rest orbits. As a phenomenon it can occur both in air and under water.

 

Sonoluminescence

from http://www-phys.llnl.gov/N_Div/sonolum/

Sonoluminescence: an Introduction

About the LLNL sonoluminescence experiment

What is sonoluminescence?

Sonoluminescence is the emission of light by bubbles in a liquid excited by sound. It was first discovered by scientists at the University of Cologne in 1934, but was not considered very interesting at the time.[1]

In recent years, a number of researchers have sought to understand this phenomenon in more detail. A major breakthrough occurred when Gaitan et al. were able to produce single-bubble sonoluminescence, in which a single bubble, trapped in a standing acoustic wave, emits light with each pulsation.[2] Before this development, research was hampered by the instability and short lifetime of the phenomenon.

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