78 years ago, July 21, 1930: Artist challenges Newtonian Theory, Revising Other Scientific Principles -PRESENT IDEAS "PRIMITIVE"

ARTIST CHALLENGES NEWTONIAN THEORY
Head of Society of Arts and Sciences Writing Book Revising Other Scientific Principles.
PRESENT IDEAS "PRIMITIVE"
Walter Russell Promised to Disprove in Series of Pamphlets Many Accepted Beliefs.

Walter Russell, artist and president of the Society of Arts and Sciences, announces yesterday the publication by him at his own expense of the first of a series of sixteen pamphlets to embody his speculations about the universe and the constitution of matter, which, he says, differ radically from many commonly accepted scientific beliefs. He further announced that he intends to send the first pamphlet, dealing with the "cyclic theory of continuous motion, or the Russell genero-radiative concept," to "leading scientists throughout the world."
According to Mr. Russell, "the fundamentals of science are so hopelessly wrong and so contrary to nature that nothing but a major surgical operation upon the present primitive beliefs can ever put them in line for a workable cosmogenic synthesis."
Newton's mathematically proved principle that if the orbital motions of the planets were stopped they would fall into the sun is among those challenged by Mr. Russell, who claims that an experiment conducted by him with a "miniature model of the solar system" convinces him that no such thing would happen.
Mr. Russell denies the universally accepted law that "like charges repel and opposite charges attract each other." "If this were true," he asks, "why is it that positive and negative poles of a bar magnet are at its opposite ends as far as they can get away from each other, instead of being together in the middle, as they should be logically if the law were true?"
Mr. Russell launches into further speculation which he promises to "prove" in his succeeding fifteen pamphlets. "Many new metals," he writes, "of great value to industry can be secured by understanding nature's simple but hitherto unknown principles. An ocean steamship like the Leviathan could produce her own fuel at negligible cost from sea water in a machine no larger than a newspaper printing press. Carbon metal could be developed with a tensile strength double that of Bessemer steel. Silicon steel will become an ideal structural steel, with more than double its present strength, and very much cheaper, because of the unlimited supply of sand, than iron ore."
Severeal years ago Mr. Russell figured in the news by writing to Henry Ford to work isolating "luminon" from coal, a substance that, Russell said, would "make Ford rich and women beautiful." In 1926, he printed privately "The Universal One," embodying his present theories, which scientists looked upon with disfavor.