Water - compilation

gday. this is going to be a really barebones blogpost.

i've been reading Nikola Tesla (the boundary-layer bladeless turbine) and Viktor Schauberger, and would like to draw attention to a few forthcoming quotes (i have them at home - will add tomorrow - finally added ;)).

however, when going online and trying to find info, this is the kind of stuff im looking for
1) Water, is at its densest, and heaviest, at +4C. this can be verified from WikiPedia - both statements.
1.1) however, what WikiPedia does not verify, is whether water would, at +4C, have a greater capacity to carry.
1.1.1) however, Viktor Schauberger proved with his log-flumes that modifying the temperature of water, would also modify its carrying capacity.
1.1.2) i am therefore looking for any kind of "actual" information about the +4C water's strength to carry.

2.1) Walter Russell speaks how inside a quartz crystal is a spoonful of water. And how planet earth gives birth to water inside (Stephan Riess connection). 2.2) in Joseph Bender's "Water - exotic substance" documentary he mentions Dynes per CM, a unit of Surface Tension - i.e. how easily water passes through the Lipid Membrane into the cell. would anyone like to extrapolate on this?

3) Nikola Tesla Bladeless Turbine description:
Tesla Bladeless Turbine, page 235 - Tesla - Man out of time by Margaret Cheney
"What I have done," Tesla explained, "is to discard entirely the idea that there must be a solid wall in front of the steam and to apply in a practical way, for the first time, two properties which every physicist knows to be common to all fluids but which have not been utilized. These are adhesion and viscosity." (2)
"When deriving energy from any kind of fluid," Tesla elaborated, "it is admitted at the periphery and escapes at the center (ED: CENTRIPETAL); when, on the contrary, the fluid is to be energized, it enters in the center and is expelled at the periphery (ED: CENTRIFUGAL!). In either case it traverses the interstices between the disks in a spiral path, power being derived from or imparted to it, by purely molecular action. In this novel manner the heat energy of steam or explosive mixtures can be transformed with high economy.... (3)
He saw no limits to its uses. With gasoline fuel it could power automobiles and airplanes. It could drive ocean liners across the Atlantic in three days. It could be used for trains, trucks, refrigeration, hydraulic gearing (motion transfer), agriculture, irrigation, and mining -- and it would run on steam as well as gasoline. He was even designing a futuristic automobile that he planned to power with it. Above all, he believed that the turbine would be inexpensive to manufacture compared to traditional models.
2. F.P. Stockbridge, "The Tesla Turbine," The World's Work, march 1912, pp. 534-48. See also Nikola Tesla, "Tesla's New Method of and Apparatus for Fluid Propulsion," Electrical Review & Western Electrician, September 9, 1911, pp.515-17; New York Times, "Tesla's New Engine," September 13, 1911. U.S. Patent Office: Patent 1,061,142, Fluid Propulsion, May 6, 1913; 1,061,206, Turbine, May 6, 1913; 1,329,559, Valvular Conduit, February 3, 1920.
3. Stockbridge, "Turbine."

4) water-dictionary:

adhesion - the molecular attraction asserted between the surfaces of bodies in contact. Compare cohesion.
cohesion - a molecular attraction by which the particles of a body are united throughout the mass whether like or unlike.
freezing - the change of a liquid into a solid as temperature decreases. For water, the freezing point is 32F or 0C.
natural flow - the rate of water movement past a specified point on a natural stream. The flow comes from a drainage area in which there has been no stream diversion caused by storage, import, export, return flow, or change in consumptive use caused by man-controlled modifications to land use. Natural flow rarely occurs in a developed country.
nitrogen - a plant nutrient that can cause an overabundance of bacteria and algae when high amounts are present, leading to a depletion of oxygen and fish kills. Several forms occur in water, including ammonia, nitrate, nitrite or elemental nitrogen. High levels of nitrogen in water are usually caused by agricultural runoff or improperly operating wastewater treatment plants.
phosphorous - a plant nutrient that can cause an overabundance of bacteria and algae when high amounts are present, leading to a depletion of oxygen and fish kills. High levels of phosphorous in water are usually caused by agricultural runoff or improperly operating wastewater treatment plants.
nutrient - as a pollutant, any element or compound, such as phosphorous or nitrogen, that fuels abnormally high organic growth in aquatic ecosystems. Also see eutrophic.
eutrophic - having a large or excessive supply of plant nutrients (nitrates and phosphates).
oligotrophic - having a low supply of plant nutrients.
pathogen - microorganisms which can cause disease.
permeability - the ability of a water bearing material to transmit water. It is measured by the quantity of water passing through a unit cross section, in a unit time, under 100 percent hydraulic gradient.
pH - numeric value that describes the intensity of the acid or basic (alkaline) conditions of a solution. The pH scale is from 0 to 14, with the neutral point at 7.0. Values lower than 7 indicate the presence of acids and greater than 7.0 the presence of alkalis (bases). Technically speaking, pH is the logarithm of the reciprocal (negative log) of the hydrogen ion concentration (hydrogen ion activity) in moles per liter.
capillary zone - soil area above the water table where water can rise up slightly through the cohesive force of capillary action.
phreatophytes - plants that send their roots into or below the capillary zone to use ground water.
precipitate - a solid which has come out of an aqueous solution. (ex., iron from groundwater precipitates to a rust colored solid when exposed to air).
saline water - water containing more than 1,000 parts per million (ppm) of dissolved solids of any type.
fresh water - water containing less than 1,000 parts per million (ppm) of dissolved solids of any type.
saturation - the condition of a liquid when it has taken into solution the maximum possible quantity of a given substance at a given temperature and pressure.
primary treatment - mechanical treatment in which large solids are screened out and suspended solids in the sewage settle out as sludge.
secondary treatment - second step in most waste treatment systems, in which bacteria break down the organic parts of sewage wastes; usually accomplished by bringing the sewage and bacteria together in trickling filters or in the activated sludge process.
tertiary treatment - removal from wastewater of traces or organic chemicals and dissolved solids that remain after primary treatment and secondary treatment.
sediment - soil particles, sand, and minerals washed from the land into aquatic systems as a result of natural and human activities.
sedimentary cycle - biogeochemical cycle in which materials primarily are moved from land to sea and back again.
sedimentation - a large scale water treatment process where heavy solids settle out to the bottom of the treatment tank after flocculation.
siltation - the deposition of finely divided soil and rock particles upon the bottom of stream and river beds and reservoirs.
specific conductance - a measure of the ability of a water to conduct an electrical current. Specific conductance is related to the type and concentration of ions in solution and can be used for approximating the dissolved solids concentration in water. In general, for the San Antonio River basin, conductivity * .6 approximates TDS. People monitoring water quality can measure electrical conductivity quickly in the field and estimate TDS without doing any lab tests at all.
TDS - total dissolved solids - the sum or all inorganic and organic particulate material. TDS is an indicator test used for wastewater analysis and is also a measure of the mineral content of bottled water and groundwater. There is a relationship between TDS and conductivity. In general, for the San Antonio River basin, TDS/.6 approximates conductivity. Or, conductivity * .6 approximates TDS. People monitoring water quality can measure electrical conductivity quickly in the field and estimate TDS without doing any lab tests at all.
streamflow - the discharge that occurs in a natural channel.
water - the liquid that descends from the clouds as rain; forms streams, lakes, and seas, and is a major constituent of all living matter. It is an odorless, tasteless, colorless, very slightly compressible liquid.